5 Reasons to House Hunt This Fall!

The frenzy of the summer real estate market has cooled by the seemingly very same breeze sweeping leaves off the trees across much of the country. But now may be a better time than ever for you to start house hunting.autumn

According to RealtyTrac and realtor.com®, October is the best time to snag a deal on a house. RealtyTrac analyzed more than 32 million sales of single-family homes and condos between 2000 and 2015, finding that those who purchased in October paid 2.6 percent below the average estimated full market value for their property. Oct. 8, specifically, seems to offer the best deals for buyers with an average 10.8 percent discount.

If you need more reason to start or continue your home search this fall, here are five additional reasons to shop for a home!

1. Less focus on landscaping. While the spring and summer bring green grass and plant life, fall may actually allow buyers to concentrate on the condition of a home’s exterior better. Viewing houses in the fall, you can spot exterior flaws and even landscaping problems, setting you up to deal with these issues before you buy the house.

2. The pressure is off. Less competition from other buyers who are pressed by deadlines, such as the start of the school year, means a stress-free pace for buyers.

3. Agents have more time. Ok, some agents have time- while we stay busy- we’re always ready to give our clients the attention they deserve, often times in the fall we may have fewer buyer clients so this could be a big advantage to you!

4. Better deals. Those who are selling in the fall likely have personal deadlines they’d like to meet, such as relocating for a job. Sometimes, sellers are more willing to lower their asking price than they would be during the summer months.

5. Fewer bidding wars. By taking advantage of the seasonal hiatus by other buyers, there’s less chance that your clients will be outbid by someone else.

If you’re ready to start your home search, call us, email us! We’re ready and now is a great time to buy!

http://www.greenbrierrealestateservice.com
304.645.2255
Gregory Allman, Broker

Article adapted from Realtor Magazine

Top 15 Questions to Ask Your Agent

Be a well informed buyer…ask your agent these questions when touring a home.

Our agents tour homes every day. Pick your agent’s brain for any unique qualities that stand out or flaws that you could be unaware of. If your agent doesn’t know the answer to a question, she or he can always ask the seller’s agent later.

Common questions to ask your agent:

  • What do you like about the home?
  • Do you have any concerns about this home?
  • Is the price right?
  • How long has this home been on the market?
  • How quickly do you think this home will sell?
  • How long have the current owners owned the home?
  • Why is the home for sale?
  • How old is the home?
  • Are any repairs needed?
  • How old is the roof?
  • When were the floors last refinished?
  • What type of heating and cooling systems are in place?
  • How old is the electrical and plumbing?
  • Can you see a copy of the current owner’s utilities?
  • Is there a homeowner’s association with fees?

 

Article adapted from Redfin.com


Our professional REALTORs at Greenbrier Real Estate Service are always willing to answer any questions you may have. Contact us today! 304.645.2255

Upcoming Events in the Greenbrier Valley:

September 21-23: Giant Fall Flea Market 9am-6pm WV State Fairgrounds
Other area events can be found at Greenbrier Valley Events  and Hashtag WV

 

 

Things to Look for on a Home Tour

Before you begin touring, research homes online and start narrowing down your must-haves versus nice-to-haves. Then try to find homes to tour within your price range. When you get more serious about your house hunt, you’ll want a trustworthy real estate agent to help point out flaws, keep you within your budget, and tell you when to walk away.

Now, you’ve requested to see a home from your trusted Greenbrier Real Estate Service REALTOR. You’re off to a great start! Take a look at this list of things to look for while you’re viewing the home…

Once inside a home, try everything.

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Sight lines, cabinet storage, style, floorplan all things to keep in mind when on a home tour.

Follow common courtesy but don’t be shy—open and shut the cupboards, flush the toilets, and whip out the measuring tape. Here are a few key things to look for on each tour:

  • Architectural style
  • Number, location, and size of bedrooms
  • Number, location, and size of bathrooms
  • Closet and storage space
  • Number of floors
  • Sight lines through home
  • General floorplan
  • Age and condition of appliances
  • Light switches and number of sockets in each room
  • Plumbing and water pressure
  • Amount of natural light and views, if any
  • Noise levels inside and outside the home
  • Width and types of stairways
  • Porches and decks
  • Garage and/or parking capacity
  • Proximity to neighboring homes
  • Remodeling opportunities

Don’t forget the exterior

Don’t forget to walk around the entire home and property. Pay attention to the age and condition of the roof and siding. Does the landscaping look like it will be a lot of work? If you don’t have a green thumb and don’t want to hire a gardener every month, you may want to look for a home with easy outdoor upkeep.

Take notes and photos

It’s easy to get homes mixed up so take photos, videos, and notes on each tour. Photograph features you particularly like and dislike about each home, and share these insights with your agent. Looking through your photos and notes with fresh eyes may also trigger additional questions you have about the home.

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Photo by Miesha Moriniere on Pexels.com

Research the neighborhood

Take few minutes before or after your home tour to check out the neighborhood. How does the neighborhood feel? Is it bustling or quiet? Is there shopping, dining, and gas nearby? What are the schools like?

The bottom line

Home buying takes plenty of compromise and patience. It’s easy to fall in love with a home at first sight—and if you love a home, chances are everyone else will too. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but just realize that you may be up against some competition. Be prepared to make multiple offers before you find the right home at the right price.

As always our REALTORS at Greenbrier Real Estate Service are always dedicated to guiding you through this process. Stay tuned for our next blog!–Things to ask Your Real Estate Agent– a continuation of Things to Look for on your Home Tour.


Greenbrier Real Estate Service
Gregory Allman, Broker
304.645.2255

The 5 Best Things to Do When You Move into Your New Home

Moving into your dream home can be a daunting task. Between unpacking, cleaning, and trying to find that stray roll of toilet paper, it may feel like you’ve lost your mind in a sea of Bubble Wrap.

That’s why we wanted to share with you five simple things that you should do during the first month in your new home. These may feel like back-burner tasks, but really, they’ll help you sleep better at night and make your new place feel less like a house and more like your home.

#1 Lock It Up

Security is the No. 1 concern for most people in a new environment. You can easily switch out your locks and deadbolts to your new home to protect your valuables and your family.

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Photo by PhotoMIX Ltd. on Pexels.com

Now’s the time to consider the lockset finish, and the options are endless. When it comes to exterior locks, make sure you choose something that looks timeless and can be cleaned easily.

A new security system is also a good idea. The options for this are endless as well. Systems with online monitoring, smartphone compatibility, thermostat control, and even video monitors for the interior including the baby nursery are super helpful. Even if that room is empty now, it might not be in the future – so go ahead and secure it!

#2 Remove Toilet Seats

Some folks may think it’s unnecessary to replace toilet seats, but my point here is to simply remove them. By removing your toilet seats, you can really deep clean under the bolts and hinges where the “yucks” like to hide. 

You can reinstall your existing seat or opt to shop for a new one. New versions with night-lights, padding, or even child-sized attachments are available. Either way, you’ll know your favorite seat in the house is ready for your entire family.

#3 Improve Your Home’s Air

Changing an air filter is a three-minute task, and it should be done right after moving into a new home – even if the previous owners swear the chore was just done. Changing out a filter can help improve the performance of your air conditioning and furnace and help with any allergens in the home.

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This inexpensive fix can also save you money! The U.S. Department of Energy says that replacing your dirty air filter with a new one can lower your A/C’s energy consumption by 5 percent to 10 percent.

It’s a good idea to write the replacement date directly on the filter when you put it in so you can be sure you know how long it’s been since the last change.

Also, take the time to test and change out batteries in all your smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors. These are often tested during inspections, but the batteries can die and tampered-with units aren’t uncommon, especially if a house was left vacant.

#4  Paint Your Front Door

Painting your front door (or freshening it up with a coat of oil if it’s wood) can show your new neighbors that you’ve arrived on the block and are investing in your home. This simple task is so easy!

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After you do proper prep work, which includes sanding the surface, make sure you pick an exterior-grade paint and use a high-quality bristle brush to give it multiple thin coats for the best coverage. It’s a great time to show off your personal style, and these days any color goes!

Every day you walk in through your newly made-over door, you’ll feel welcomed into your new home and inspired to keep creating a space you love.

#5 Choose Your Signature Scent

Every house has a smell. You know what I’m talking about. It’s that “other people smell” that’s definitely not your own particular brand of aroma. Even if the smell isn’t bad, it just isn’t yours, and that makes you feel like an intruder in someone else’s space. Make your dream home even more dreamy by filling it with your signature scent.

Don’t have a signature scent? Check out a candle store or the air-freshener aisle to peruse the options, and then regularly use your favorite in your new home. My favorite is a lemon-vanilla-rosemary mix that I let simmer all day on the stove; it fills every room of the house.

In homes that have particularly distressing “stanks,” try getting the carpets cleaned before moving in the furniture. It can eliminate the smell as well as remove allergens, dirt, and stains.

This article was adapted from Katie and Jeremy Bower/House Logic


Happening now in the Greenbrier Valley!

The State Fair of WV! Check out all that it has to offer!

Thinking of moving to our area? We would love to help you find your new home?

Contact us! 304.645.2255
Gregory Allman, Broker

5 Mortgage Misconceptions Set Straight

Getting a mortgage can be a breeze or a slog, depending on what you know about the process. To get organized and set your expectations properly, let’s debunk some common mortgage myths.

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1. Lenders use your best credit scores

If you’re applying for a mortgage jointly with a co-borrower, logic suggests that your lender would use the highest credit score between both of you.

However, lenders take the middle of three credit scores (from Equifax, TransUnion and Experian) for each borrower, and then use the lowest score between both borrowers’ “middle scores.”

So, if you had a middle score of 780, and your co-borrower had a middle score of 660, most lenders would qualify and approve you using the 660 credit score.

Rates are tied to credit scores, so in this example, your rate would be based on the 660 credit score, which would push your rate up significantly — or potentially even make you ineligible for the loan.

There are exceptions to this lowest-case-credit-score rule. Most notably, if you have the higher credit score and are also the higher earner, some lenders will allow your higher credit score on the file — but this is mostly for jumbo loans above $417,000.

Ask your lender about exceptions if you have credit score disparity between co-borrowers, but know that these exceptions are rare.

2. The rate you’re quoted is the rate you’ll get

Unless you’re locking in a rate at the moment it’s quoted, that rate quote can change. Rates are tied to daily trading of mortgage bonds, so most lenders’ rates change throughout each day.

Refinancers can often lock a rate when it’s quoted — as long as you’ve given your lender enough information and documentation to determine if you qualify for the quoted rate.

You typically receive a quote when you’re beginning your pre-approval process, but a rate lock runs with a borrower and a property. So until you’ve found a home to buy, you can’t lock your rate. And while you’re home shopping, rates will be changing daily, so you’ll need updated quotes from your lender throughout your home shopping process.

Rate quotes also come with an annual percentage rate (APR), which is a federally required disclosure that shows what your rate would be if all loan fees are incorporated into the rate.

This can make you think that APR is the rate you’ll get, but your loan payment will always be based on your locked rate, and the APR is just a disclosure to help you understand fees.

3. Fixed-rate mortgages are always better than adjustable-rate mortgages

After the 2008 financial crisis, many borrowers started preferring 30-year fixed loans. For good reason too: The rate and payment on a 30-year fixed loan can never change. But the longer the rate is fixed for, the higher the rate.

So before settling on a 30-year fixed, ask yourself this question: How long am I going to own this home (or keep the loan) for?blue-rendered-outline-house-and-yellow-percent-sign_573x300.jpg

Suppose the answer is five years. If you got a five-year adjustable rate mortgage (ARM) instead of a 30-year fixed, your rate would be about .875 percent lower. On a $200,000 loan, you’d save $146 per month in interest by taking the five-year ARM. On a $600,000 loan, the monthly interest cost savings is $438.

To optimize your home financing, peg the loan term as closely as you can to your expected time horizon in the home.

4. Real estate agents don’t care which lender you use

A federal law enacted in 1974 called the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act (RESPA) prohibits lenders and real estate agents from paying each other fees to refer customers to each other. So as a mortgage shopper, you’re always free to use any lender you choose.

But real estate agents who would represent you as a buyer do care which lender you use. They’ll often suggest that you use a local lender who’s experienced with your area’s nuances, such as local taxation rules, settlement procedures and appraisal methodologies.

–You can contact us to get more information about lenders in our area!

These areas are all part of the loan process and can delay or kill deals if a nonlocal lender isn’t experienced enough to handle them.

Likewise, real estate agents representing sellers on homes you’re interested in will often prioritize purchase offers based on the quality of loan approvals. Local lenders who are known and respected by listing agents give your purchase offers more credibility.

5. Mortgage insurance is always required if you put less than 20 percent down

Mortgage insurance is a lender-risk premium placed on many home loans when you’re putting less than 20 percent down. In short, it means your total monthly housing cost is higher. But you can buy a home with less than 20 percent down and avoid mortgage insurance.

The most common way to do this is with a combination first and second mortgage — often called a piggyback — where the first mortgage is capped at 80 percent of the home’s value, and the second mortgage is for the balance of what you want to finance.

 

We hope that you found this information helpful!
Any questions, feel free to contact us!
304.645.2255

Home Buying Checklist

This checklist and the right agent will help you get on the right track in your house hunt!

Buying a home can be bewildering and stressful. (We get it.) And we’re here for you every step of the way.

We think this simple and easy to use checklist is great! So we’re sharing it! Trulia’s printable home buying checklist breaks down the process and points you to the tips and tools you need to find your next place. Download the PDF here to get started on your real estate journey. You can also contact us to help you start the process!

1. Gather Financials

Before you start looking at homes for sale, get your financial house in order. First, request your credit report from all three bureaus (Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion). Comb through each report to ensure it’s accurate — and fix any errors you spot!

money pink coins pig
Photo by Skitterphoto on Pexels.com

Next, compile all the documents you may need to provide to a loan officer, including pay stubs, bank statements, and previous years’ tax returns.

2. Research Mortgages

Credit score and financial documents in hand, you’re ready to start researching options for your home loan.

Take advantage of online aids. You can comparison shop from a diverse group of reputable lenders in all 50 states, ranging from small, regional providers to larger, well-known brands such as Citi and Bank of America. You’ll get a personalized quote and can read lender reviews and ratings to help gain insights into which lender is right for you.

One of the best things to tackle on this section of the home buying checklist? Find out if you qualify for a special loan, such as a Veterans Affairs (VA) loan or any special home buying financing options through state or federal programs.

Make sure you get that mortgage preapproval letter — it’ll make you a more competitive buyer!

3. Explore Neighborhoods

Now for the fun part of the home buying checklist! It’s time to explore neighborhoods.

Investigate everything from commute times to walk score to school ratings and crime activity. Once you’ve honed in on the right neighborhood for your new place, be sure to check out bordering neighborhoods for even more options.

bright flora flowers homes
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

4. Make a shopping list

As you get deeper into the process, it can be tough to keep your priorities straight. The more homes you see, the more you can lose track of what really matters.

Yes, that home has a gourmet kitchen with stainless steel appliances. But it’s $75,000 above the comfortable high in your price range — worth it?

That’s where this section of the home buying checklist comes into play: the home-shopping list. Take a few hours to hone in on exactly what constitutes a “must-have” item in your new home and then expand upon those points to determine what might constitute your “nice-to-have” and “dream features.”

writing notes idea class
Photo by Startup Stock Photos on Pexels.com

For example, a well-lit kitchen with ample storage space and new-ish appliances might be in your must-have section, stainless steel appliances and granite countertops in your nice-to-have section, and a chef-style gas range and pot filler in your dream-features section.

Knowing what matters most will help you and your real estate agent navigate the home buying process more quickly — and with less confusion.

5. Find an agent

As with any profession, there are amazing, miracle-working real estate agents … and there are some less than stellar ones. While it may seem like an easy to-do on the home buying checklist, finding a real estate agent is one of the most important steps in the process.

Ask family and friends for recommendations — and be sure to call your prospective agent’s references to get details on their experience.

But above all else, be sure to choose an agent who specializes in the type of home you’re seeking and is an expert on your desired neighborhood.

6. Start house hunting!

You’re so close to the finish line! (Well, almost.) This is when the real action begins.

Now that you’ve completed all preliminary steps on the home buying checklist, you’re ready to start searching. Online listings are a great place to start–check out our listing on our website! Click here! Visit open houses and work with your agent to schedule private showings.

Enjoy the house hunt, because your next steps — negotiating with sellers, home inspections, closing costs, and more — still lie ahead.

Article adapted from Trulia.com

How to Find the Right Person to Sell Your House

Your guide to hiring the listing agent who can set you up for success.

Your home is where you’ve lived and loved, where you’ve laughed and cried, where you’ve huddled and snuggled. You’re the pea, your home is the pod. And you’ve been through a lot together.

Now that it’s time to put it on the market, you’re likely experiencing some sadness, plus plenty of anxiety. Because really: How often does your future depend on selling your past? If you’re a little overwhelmed, we don’t blame you.

But there’s also good news: You don’t have to go it alone.

A listing agent has your back when it comes to the financials, like setting a listing price and marketing, staging, and making repairs to your house. He or she can also help you navigate more personal issues, such as your timeline, and what you’re hoping to achieve with the sale.

For all of those reasons, it’s important to find an expert who is right for you and your specific situation, and who can help you get what you want. Here’s how.

Know What a Listing Agent Can Do for You

Before you start interviewing prospective agents, have a clear sense of what you want to get out of the selling process. When so much money is on the table, it’s crucial to know what your goals are, so that you can find an agent who really speaks to them.

Contact us, we would love to fit you with the best REALTOR for the job. 304.645.2255 

Then, it helps to understand what a listing agent does (other than sell your most valuable asset — no big deal).

The listing agent will:

  • Work with you to price your home
  • Market your home (we’re talking pretty pictures, social media promo, cute staging — the works)
  • Negotiate with home buyers
  • Usher the home sale through inspection and closing

Now, let’s break all of that down …

Pricing your home. This is the BIG question, right? How do I set the price? The short answer is you’ll need to trust your agent to recommend a smart listing price.

So how can you tell whether an agent — a relative stranger to you — is choosing the best price for your home? You need to do two things:

  1. Know, generally speaking, what your property is worth. Do your own research on the prices of local comps, (but understand the limits of online property sites). Run your info by your agent for an informed perspective.
  2. Ask the agent for pricing information on homes he or she has recently sold.Specifically, what the differences were between their listing prices and how much the homes ultimately sold for.

When it comes to the agent’s pricing history, you’re looking for accuracy. Anyone could suggest a high price for your home, knowing it’s what you’d like to hear. But nobody (especially you) wants to have a house languish on the market, or to reduce a price repeatedly.

Marketing your home. The listing agent will also get the word out that your house is on the market, using a combination of old-school (but powerful) marketing techniques — such as direct mail, signage, and open houses — and the modern methods we know and love, like social media. Savvy agents will post pics of your house on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and any other platform that can get likes plus the attention of other real estate agents who can bring buyers to the table.

Negotiating with buyers. When offers start pouring in, your agent will negotiate with prospective buyers on not only the sale price but also on what contingencies (aka special circumstances) are attached to the contract. As with any negotiation, there could be some stressful, fraught moments with the buyers. You’ll want an agent who can step up for you, and who has a negotiation style that you’re comfortable with.

Closing the sale. Once you’ve signed a purchase agreement with a buyer (woo-hoo!), your agent will help you navigate the sale’s remaining steps. This includes negotiating home repair requests post inspection and dealing with any last-minute surprises before closing.

The average listing agent does all of the above. A great listing agent does all of the above, while also inspiring your confidence — that they’re getting the best price for you, and that they’re representing you and your home in the best possible light.

So, let’s talk about how to find and hire that kind of agent.

First of all, contact us. 304.645.2255 We know that the process of selling your home can be daunting. We are always willing to sit down and talk about what your goals are. We want to be the ones that you choose to list and sell your home. 

Click here to see a list of our expert REALTORS® that will be ready and willing to help you!

As always, one call does it all! Contact us for all your real estate needs.

Greenbrier Real Estate Service
1047 Washington St. E.
Lewisburg, WV 24957

304.645.2255

Article adapted from HouseLogic.com


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If you’re thinking of moving or wanting to list your home, fill out the form below and we’ll be in contact with you!

June-National Homeownership Month

June is National Homeownership Month! Great tips for those first time home buyers and the steps it takes to achieve those goals.

Did you know that June is National Homeownership Month?

The follow post describes what exactly it takes to be a homeowner and the steps that it takes to get there!
We would love to offer our expertise and knowledge of Real Estate to you to help you achieve your home ownership goals!

Contact us for any help needed!
304.645.2255

The Guide for First-Time Homebuyers

What you need to know about going from full-time renter to homeowner and the process in between.

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You have a lot of logistical and financial hurdles to clear before you can celebrate the biggest purchase of your life. (Getty Images)

Owning a home is a major milestone many Americans expect to achieve in their lifetime. It’s not simply about having the ability to stay in one place for years – it’s also about taking advantage of the incentives to homeownership, including the financial security to make a major investment and see it grow over time.


Even for the millennial generation, which has been slower to become a major part of the homeowner pool than previous generations, buying a house remains a key goal in life.

 

While buying a house for the first time may be intimidating, no homeowner started the process feeling confident every step of the way. Here’s what first-time homebuyers need to know.

 Are You Ready to Become a Homeowner?

Long before you start looking at houses, you have to be sure your finances are in order. The process of saving and making strategic financial decisions to ensure your credit history is more appealing to a lender can take more than a couple months if you haven’t already been working toward buying a house.

“I would say a year plus – and make sure you’re saving toward that goal over a period of time,” says Amin Dabit, director of advisory service for Personal Capital, an online financial advisory and wealth management company.

 

1. Credit history. Run a credit report on yourself – which is free to do once a year and doesn’t affect your credit by going to annualcreditreport.com and receiving a report from each the three major credit-reporting agencies – and focus on the areas you can improve. You may have credit card balances to pay off, or a few missed student loan payments from a couple years ago. You may also simply need more time to pass from a recent borrowing mistake. The more time that passes from the last blemish on your credit report, the less likely a lender is to consider it a red flag to give you a loan.

2. How much house can you afford? How good your finances look from a mortgage lender’s perspective isn’t the only thing to examine. You should also look at savings that can be used toward a down payment and determine how much you’d be able to afford on a monthly basis for your principal mortgage payment, interest, taxes and insurance, which Dabit recommends calculating as 28 percent of your gross income.

3. Savings for down-the-road expenses. Of course, you also have to take into account maintenance and other potential costs that may come up as a homeowner.

4. Who to consult. Once you’ve examined your financial history and expected future cash flow, it’s time to start talking to the professionals who will be able to help you throughout the process of buying a house.

A natural start is with a real estate agent. You can contact our home office at 304.645.2255, we are conveniently located on Washington St. E. in Lewisburg, WV. We enjoy offering our expertise to our clients. We can help you find a financial advisor if needed, a loan officer connected with a lender, real estate attorney, title insurance representative, home inspector and many more faces that will be part of your transaction.

 

Approach the process as assembling a team of people who will help you achieve homeownership.

What Mortgage Options Are Best for You?

When it comes to finding a mortgage, explore options with different lenders and the various products offered. Major banks, credit unions and nonbank lenders offer a variety of options to better fit your specific needs as a homeowner.


 How Can You Prepare to Look at Houses?

At last, Greenbrier Real Estate Service can help you start looking at houses, condos, townhouses – whatever your homeownership preference may be.

Work with your agent to determine your list of must-haves in a home, whether it’s based on the number of bedrooms for kids and guests, the neighborhood that’s near your favorite restaurants and bars or a yard for your pets.

Take care to also get a realistic understanding of what your budget allows in your market.


What Should You Include in the Offer?

It may be the first house you tour with your agent – or it may be the 30th – but when you’re ready to make an offer on a house, it’s time to determine how much you’d like to offer, your needs and the seller’s as well. The latter might include a quick closing date, necessary repairs or covering closing costs.

 

Your preapproval for a mortgage will be an important part of formulating an enticing offer, so be ready with the preapproval letter from your lender when it comes time to determine your bid price and overall offer with your agent.

If you’re house hunting in a popular neighborhood, you’ll need to move quickly in making a decision and formulating an offer. If your agent expects there to be multiple offers on the property, be ready to put your best and final price on the table from the get-go.


Next Steps Toward Owning a Home

Once negotiations have finalized, the contract has been signed and you’ve provided a small amount of cash as a deposit or earnest money, you’ll have a few days to conduct your due diligence on the property. That includes the home inspection, which will tell you if there are any issues with the property that could affect the amount you’re willing to pay or if there’s anything that should be repaired before you move in.

 

You should also have funds ready for the closing costs, which typically account for between 2 percent to 5 percent of the sale price.

Your mortgage lender will also be working on the underwriting for the loan, including an appraisal of the property to ensure the purchase price matches its value, based on other sales of similar properties in the area. If the appraiser determines the house isn’t valued at the agreed-upon sale price, you may have to come up with cash to make up the difference, or try to negotiate the price down with the seller. You’ll likely have to provide updated proof of income, details on your existing debts and assets, information about your tax return and, of course, the address of the property you’re buying along with the price of the house and amount you’d like to borrow.

Just before closing, you’ll visit the home one more time, the final walk-through helps ensure there hasn’t been any additional damage to the house, and anything you expect to be gone has been removed before you get the keys.

The last step is the closing itself, which transfers the down payment to the seller, finalizes the mortgage and, with a few signatures including title clearance, transfers the deed into your name. You have the keys, and you’re officially a homeowner.

By Devon Thorsby US NEWS

If Greenbrier Real Estate Service can be of any help during your home buying process, please contact us.

We value our clients and enjoy giving our dedication and expertise of Real Estate to them!

Contact us!

Greenbrier Real Estate Service
1047 Washington St. E.
Lewisburg, WV 24901
304.645.2255

Greg Allman, Broker